12-30-05
West Side Club has moved. Rated g/90 will be January 7th at Cherry Hills Library, 6901 Barstow in NE Albuquerque. Other Saturdays, the club meets at Borders Book Store, Wyoming at Academy in Albuquerque. For info, contactRod Avery at 821-8482.

12-27-05
Last call for entries to the latest DK chess quiz. If you wish to email me your answers to the quiz you have until Saturday. btw I have already received right answers to all the questions (not all from the same entrant) except for 1 d. So if anybody knows which current NM player/coach played Bobby Fischer at Houston as part of Fischer’s 1964 nationwide tour, you should email the answer to me. If you would like to add the answers to some other questions that would be even better.

Need help? See the clues I gave on my previous Forum posting.

Jim Johnston

12-20-05
Westside Chess Club is moving!
The club will no longer meet at North Valley Library, but officers are scouting for another location.

Possibilities include Borders Bookstore at Wyoming/Academy for casual Saturdays, and Cherry Hills Library for quieter events including the January 7th rated games. Borders and Cherry Hills have both stated that the chess club will be welcomed!

If you have other suggestions, please write in to the forum or to club president Rod Avery. Check back here in a few days to find out the new location.

Susan

12-19-05
I would like to suggest a Non Profit Foundation
be set up possibly in the honor of a deceased top player of the past whereby folks may make tax deductible contributions. The purpose of this Foundation would be to provide a prize fund base for such chess events as a “New Mexico Closed” of top New Mexico chess players and other tournaments. Anyone have any thoughts on this? I am not a CPA and do not claim to have the expertise to form such a foundation but do have connections to one of these that was formed in the Pacific Northwest that funded many chess tournaments.

-Wayne Hatcher,
Secretary/Treasurer of West Side Chess Club

12-16-05
I am glad that Daniel Spohn and others appreciate the film.
It is like the “COACH CARTER of CHESS” to me. I want to find another chess club that would like to take their game to higher levels. I remember when I took Bernalillo Mid-School to the Nationals in Buena Park, California. We were sponsored by Mr.Maloof and the great fans of Bernalillo, Placitas, Pena Blanca, and San Felipe Pueblo. Many years later, I had the sheer joy of taking Edwin Wong to several National events at San Jose, Phoenix, Tucson and many other places. At this time in my life, I would like to find another group of really interested players to mentor. You can reach me at 254-1280 or at bearlewine@hotmail.com. I want this to be my contribution to making this world a better place.

Brad Earlewine

12-13-05
First in response to Brad’s question “What did you think of the movie” Knights of the South Bronx”? “
I thought that it was done very well! I loved the actors and the portrayal of the game, although i thought that those kids picked it up to fast. I know that even my elementary school kids that are good for their age could not play without a board like they do in the movie (I still have some problems with doing that to any real level of skill.) The only reason i mention that is because i feel that it would discourage some younger kids who saw the movie to thinking that they could not become champions because they can not accomplish what these kids who just learned the game can. Even with this I still highly enjoyed the movie and thought it was very inspirational.

Secondly, and more importantly, I want to address both the issues of time control and the current state of chess in New Mexico. I agree with Jeffery Martin on time controls and even though I love fast controls I know that I play to much higher quality and feel better about my game (win or lose) after a slow control which allow me to push myself to the extent of my ability. As a player that is trying very hard to strengthen my rating (I’ve gone from being 1217 last december to being 1721 this december) I know that while I’ve been studying books and working tactic and positional chess problems that it has been during my long games (The Albuquerque Open especially) that I have been able to assess my chess and learn how much I have been able to take in. I really believe that playing longer games (whether in a tournament or just with a friend) are a key part in improving chess ability. I would like to make it known that I am not criticizing NMCO in any way and I believe that New Mexico really is improving its chess. I would love to see both a 40/2 G/1 and an all expert and master tournament. Even though I dont qualify I would come and support it by watching.
Daniel Spohn

12-13-05
The Moab Chess Club invites New Mexico players to join us in a Southern Utah chess tradition. This chess festival will honor the memory of GM Igor Ivanov who passed away last month. Moab is about 6 hours from Albuquerque, and a beautiful drive. There will be three tournaments over three days: Wednesday 12/28 an evening 7-RR G/15, Thursday 12/29 a G/75 4-SS Open tournament with decent cash prizes, and Friday 12/30 a G/75 3-RR Quad tournament with low entry fees for fun. You can play 14 rated games plus gas and lodging for less than the entry fee for the American Open! Of course, their cash prizes are way better, so if your game is hot, go make some money over the holidays. But if you’re just pushing wood right now, here’s a fun alternative. Lodging is $28/night, and Moab usually has great New Year’s Eve events for players and families who stay the weekend. Hope to see you here!

Damian Nash
tournaments@krusemer.com

12-11-05
Albuquerque’s Madison Middle School is exploring the possiblity of sending an all girls chess team to the Susan Polgar National Open Championships for Girls
in Corpus Christis, Texas. The tournament will take place Janaury 27-29, 2006. We have funds for entry fees and for hotel rooms. We need funds for air transportation for five girls. We estiamte that the cost would be $1,500. If you belive it’s a good idea for middle school girls to have the opportunity to compete on the national level in chess, and if you would be interested in helping the girls, please contact Eddie Sedillo, Madison Middle School Chess Coach at 505-417-6389 or Mike Kristek at 505-877-1254.

12-07-05
What did you think of the movie” Knights of the South Bronx”?
When I first tried to enter elementary kids in the Albuquerque Chess League in 1988,, I was told it was only for High School and Junior High School. We have come a long way since then. I remember taking my chess teams to Atlanta, where I met Dr. J and to San Jose, Kansas City, Spokane,Tucson and many other cities. Those were the days when it was really cool for youngsters in Primary grades to beat High Schoolers at National Tournaments. Those days are gone because now it is all outsourced to The SuperNationals and the All-American Cups that only the rich and elite can afford.

Brad E.

12-07-05
Desert Knight On CD ROM??
 . This is something  I am putting forward  for  several reasons.

 

One reason is  financial.  The price of printing continues to rise as paper, printing plates and labor go up in cost .   To issue  DK on CD ROM, the cost would be about 50cents each  which is substantially less than printing the DK magazine  Of course, there are some players who do not own computers,  so our entry blank would have to have a check box to reserve either hard copy or CD.  Every dollar we save can be used to increase prize funds.

 

There are other good reasons: Among the best are that we can offer all the games in DK in database form: Chess Base, PGN and text  in addition to  the usual PDF files that we now have on the NMCO web site, available for downloading, –  both for viewing on screen and printing the hard copy issue.  Other programs included would be the latest version of Adobe Reader to read and print PDF files, free  interactive chess programs  such as Chesspad so that those who do not have a chess playing program (i.e. Fritz, Junior, Shredder, Chessmaster)  could  load the DK games and play them out on screen , while reading the commentary and analysis. Chesspad comes with a reasonably strong chess playing engine and will run other engines that are available for free d/l on the internet.

 

I would be very much interested in feedback, favorable or otherwise, and any ideas you think could be an asset  to such a CD ROM.. Please post your replies here on the forum

 

Art Byers, Secretary NMCO

12-02-05
Thanks Diane – I second the motion!

The facilities at Eldorado were quite good for a blitz event. The cookies and sodas were an added attraction,
and I’m pleased that many strong players showed up. The campus was rather large, but everybody finally seemed
to find our playing site (which may possibly shift to the cafeteria, closer to the parking lot, the next time we
play there) eventually.

We had organized this as just-another-blitz event, but were highly uncertain about the turnout. One school of thought
said that people would be bored by the 3rd day of a 4 day weekend and would be itching for blitz chess, another school
said that too many people would be involved with family and holiday activities to bother. We may very well make this
a regular blitz event.

After making the state blitz championship quick-rated (and thus using a 2 second time delay) we decided not to
do it for this tournament. Thoughts? Players still seem to be divided on this issue. Some like to delay for giving them
a shade more time, others prefer the pace to be as rapid as possible. We don’t seem to have as many people
suggesting that these blitz events be quick-rated as in previous years…

NMCO hasn’t planned the next blitz event, but I’m thinking of late February or early March (to be worked around
the many scholastic and league events which are held that month).

Jeffrey Burch

12-01-05
Just wanted to say how much I enjoyed the blitz tourny this past Saturday.
My games were dismal, but the camaraderie was great.
~ Diane


11-26-05
Regarding the time control debate…

This year, I returned to chess after a 9 year absence. I remember that in 1996, the time control at my Wednesday night club was 40/2, G/1. Some games were lasting until 1:00am. A few players wanted to speed up the game to G/2, but the vast majority did not want this. I now notice that my old club is playing G/90. I realized back then that the game of chess was inevitably going to speed up. The top levels of chess were speeding up their games in an attempt to keep the interest of mainstream media, who were getting bored easily, and also in an attempt to attract more kids with lower attention spans. Another major factor in the speeding up of the game is internet chess. It is much harder to absorb into a slow game on a computer than it is in person.
I accept these faster time controls, but I want to make it clear that there are sacrifices being made in doing so. Here are the two main sacrifices, as I see it:

1) The level of play definitely decreases as you speed up the game. I can use my own games in the two tournaments I have played this year as an example. At the Pir Maleki, two of my games were won because of the G/90 format. I was worse in both of these games, but when my opponents clocks got down to their last 15 minutes, they folded. At the NM Open, in the last round my opponent had a completely won position, but his flag was close to falling and so he offered me a draw at move 50. If he had had more time, he would have taken sole possession of 2nd place. In my only loss of the tournament, I spent a lot of time defending against a Marshall attack. I had 20 minutes left to my opponent’s 50 after 27 moves. I was very happy with how well I defended, and evaluated my position as having a clear advantage. However, I decided that I needed to speed up my play at this point, or I would run the chance of losing on time. I played out a sequence of 4 moves that I superficially evaluated as being good for me, only to discover to my dismay that I was now much worse. I feel certain that if we were playing 40/2 G/1 I would have taken the time to find the correct line of play.

2) For me, the greatest joys of chess come from having the time to go more deeply into positions and taking ones positional understanding of chess to a new level. I find that there are two kinds of pleasures derived from chess. Playing a winning combination in quick chess gives one a surface-level short term satisfaction, similar to advancing to a new level in ones favorite video game. But when I play a long, slow game of chess, where I go deeply into its positions and find the best moves at different stages, this type of pleasure can last weeks, leaving a glow in my body. It inspires me to go more deeply into the game, to understand it at greater depths. I also believe that this is the best way to improve ones positional understanding of the game. At fast time controls, one can only play at one’s current level of understanding, barring blunders. At slower time controls, one has the opportunity to raise ones level of play to a new level never achieved before. Unfortunately, in a society where attention deficit seems to be coming more the norm that a disorder, where our movies are now more about feeding our adrenaline rushes and sexual stimuli, and less about subtlety, this deeper satisfaction that I am talking about becomes more of a dim memory to the instant gratification of fast chess.

With that said, I feel that G/2 is long enough to derive this kind of satisfaction from many of my games, but it would be nice to have at least one tournament in the year at 40/2 G/1, as Jessie and others suggested.

Sincerely,
Jeffrey Martin

11-23-05
NEW MEXICO CHESS ALIVE AND WELL!!!
I looked back at the tournaments I’ve directed or assisted with in Missouri. Including two Missouri Opens and two Missouri
Class tournaments. None were close in attendance to the 2005 New Mexico Open. Considering Missouri has nearly 6 million residents
and New Mexico has nearly 2 million that speaks highly of the chess community here.

Randy Merrell

11-23-05
For Xmas I am giving all my chess students little stuffed zebras
that can be used to wipe their computer screens, just like we’ll
wipe our opponents off the board! Egyptian pharaohs used two Nubian zebras to pull their war chariots. The chariots were later symbolized
by the Rook from the Arabic ( rukh) and Persian word for chariot. So there you have it!! The zebras are represented on the chessboard both
by the Rook and the Knight. Ancient African male Zebras were bred with female horses to produce the ZEBROID, a steed noted for its intelligence, speed and spirit. Zebroids hybrids were noted for their loyalty in battle and resistance to disease and injury. I am very serious about
ZEBRA CHESS and if you want to see an example of how it works, look at my game with Jim Johnson in the most recent Desert Knight.

Brad Earlewine

11-23-05
What’s all this talk about zebras? Everyone knows it’s the pig who dominates!
Do Zebras have a piece named after them?
I think not. Speaking of complex, there is no animal with a more complex life than a pig. Is the trough full? When will it be full?
When it empties, will it fill again? The blur of pink dazes the opponent. A pig can lumber at 1.5 miles an hour, maybe not as fast
as a zebra, but have you ever been snout bumped? Foes tremble at the thought. Pig chess is the latest thing, those who play rule,
just like hams did!

~ Diane aka PigsOnThe7th

11-22-05
When it comes to ZEBRAS, it is  all black and white. These  spirited, striped horse tigers have rich, complex lives. You can know
a zebra by its stripes which protect them from predators by helping them blend into the background. The flickering confusion of black
and white will  hypnotize the opponent and makes it difficult for the hunter  by creating a confusing, dazzling mass of color when zebras
move in a herd. A zebra is capable of running over 40 miles per hour and will use its hooves and teeth in defense.   Nimrod, the first king
mentioned in the Bible was ruler of Shinar and India and used to ride his wild zebra into battle. Nimrod also built the tower of Babel and
was the father of the race later known as the Huns.   My ZEBRA CHESS unveils the secret power of ZEBRAS and students and devotees
of my new style of chess will rule the chess world, just like Nimrod and the Huns ruled.   

Brad Earlewine

11-22-05 (by Jeffrey Burch)
Dave wrote
<<<
Hmm, I’m not quite sure just what to add to this ‘discussion’. Class players have always provided the monetary base to U.S. chess,
so I can’t conceive of sleighting them in terms of prizes offered. I would suggest the injection of money into the NM chess scene,
through sponsorship, either corporate or individual.

<<<

The suggestion is a good one, but making it come to pass is something else entirely.
NMCO has attempted over the years to interest corporations in sponsoring chess events, through advertising in the Desert Knight
or their outright contributions for tournament prizes and for playing sites. Although the effort is ongoing, we’ve been largely turned
down or ignored in the past. Some corporations for which NMCO officers work have been approached, but these are large businesses
with large bureaucracies, and they receive many requests for money from numerous charities and non-profit organizations. It really helps
to know people at the top who are influential in making decisions regarding such funding. That’s why at the business meeting and
elsewhere on the Forum, we’ve requested volunteers to assist us with the money search.

<<<
Chess culture in the entire U. S. is sadly lacking in comparison to other countries. It would be surprising to me if we ever had a very large
and thriving New Mexico chess scene, let alone a decent chess culture. Our scene is small with a budget similar in nature. While I applaud
the efforts of our NMCO officers in general, volunteers I remind you, I believe they err in holding too many fast tournaments; we always had a
small, but strong scene. Now it seems, we’ll just have a small scene. Too many fast games will degrade the quality of play.

<<<

NMCO has been approached by some of the stronger players to produce an all master/expert tournament, and we’re continuing to work on
this, but remember that such small events depend hugely on individual schedules and participation. Many of our top players have demanding
careers which prevent blanket agreement to playing schedules, and others travel for business purposes. Most want single game per day
formats, and this extends the duration of the tournament over several weekends, even for small numbers of players. If we simply name a
date and format for such an event, as we do for the larger tournaments held throughout the year, many top players may not be able to
commit. Besides, I continue to have problems seeing how a four-hour game is “fast.” But we’re continuing to work on this.

>>>>>>

As far as longer games goes, it is foolish to think that longer games aren’t better, on the whole; the thing speaks for itself.
<<<

On the other hand, fatigue sets in, even with younger players (and let’s face it, our top players in New Mexico are no longer young) and
errors come into play late in the game. Frustration is bound to set in when you know you’ve played a good game over the course of 5 hours,
but blunder in the 6th.

Slower time limits might occasionally be desirable, but they have to be balanced by several factors, including the number of people who
request them (very few), the availability of the playing site (not always in our control, or expensive), and desired time off between rounds
(making for very long days for both players and directors).

<<<
I also think virtually all players realize this, and is the reason the top players have always played slow time limits to determine the
championship. Quicker time limits cheapen the play, and virtually everybody knows it. In specific, I won’t play anything less than
40/2 SD/1, and therefore, while a NMCO member currently, it won’t last long. NMCO sold real chess ‘down the river’ long ago. They
should probably relegate themselves to do what they do best; offer quick games for the non-serious player, to fit in with their schedules.
This was the path NMCO took long ago, and they seem determined to follow it to its chessic helpmate.

<<<

Time limits have to be balanced against the availability and cost of playing sites and the desires of the majority of participants. We really
haven’t had a screaming demand for slower chess, except from a handful of individuals, most of whom, except for Jesse, haven’t been
participating in these events anyway for a considerable period of time. Recent past NM Opens have had occasional 35/90, SD/1 or
40/2, SD/1 time limits, but usually only in the final rounds.

Regarding your claim of slow play only, your USCF tournament history listing shows that you played in several tournaments over the
past few years which did not include 40/2 with SD/1. It’s a safe bet that your decision to play only is slow time limit tournaments is a recent one.

As far as “non-serious players” in NMCO events, we have of course had our state’s only International Master participating in our last
three state championships, as well as the 2005 Albuquerque Open and 2005 NM Memorial. Regarding master and expert level players,
we had:
– 2005 NM Open (3 masters, 4 experts)
– 2005 Albuquerque Open (3 masters, 3 experts)
– 2005 NM Memorial (4 masters, 8 experts)
– 2004 NM Open (3 masters, 2 experts)
– 2004 Albuquerque Open (no masters, 2 experts)
– 2004 NM Memorial (no masters, 2 experts)

These players had the opportunity to play out of state but elected to play in these events, and their numbers have been slightly
increasing during the last couple of years. And this is in a state containing only 6 masters and 10 experts, several of whom have
retired from tournament play.

<<<
However, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the real reason NM chess, and NMCO itself flounders; it is the fact that a good, strong
game of chess, against a nice opponent, is virtually impossible to find. Arguments, petty rivalries, and general nastiness are what drove
myself, and virtually all of my former playing partners, from the NMCO ‘scene’ long ago. It seems some players, both weak and strong,
seem to think that playing someone a game of chess gives them license to be rude and abusive. In short, the insecure, the too-contencious,
the petty, and the snarky, took over NMCO long ago.

<<<

Needless to say I disagree strongly with both the first and last sentences in your paragraph.
We’ve already shown that the master/expert participation over the last few years of NMCO tournaments has increased, so a “good, strong
game of chess” is available – if you choose play in a tournament! Top players don’t appear to be boycotting our events, at least not in large
numbers. Considering the increasing attendance and positive comments which the NMCO Executive Board receives, we do not perceive
NMCO or NM chess as “floundering”.

Regarding “nice opponents”, there are unfortunately personal squabbles which prevent some people from getting along and which may
make tournament participation undesirable for some. I’ve seen this happen in every state in which I’ve played chess. All any state organization
can do is to provide a venue and an opportunity. Finally, I’m at a loss to understand who you are talking about (those who “took over NMCO”)
when you make an accusation of being “insecure”, “too-contencious” (sic), “petty” and “snarky.” I certainly wouldn’t use any of that
terminology to describe any of the current NMCO officer or volunteer corps.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

11-22-05 (by Art Glassman)
Brad wrote (11-18-05)
I am developing a new style of chess which I call ZEBRA CHESS. I play exactly the same opening moves whether I am Black or White.
I am getting ready for my big match with that famous Jewish player AG. . . .

Now look what youve gone and done. I’ve been “outed” and Bobby Fischer won’t answer my emails any more.

And regarding ZEBRA CHESS, you’d better not trot out in the tall grass over your head, ’cause an old cheeta can catch a fat zebra
anytime (the Vultures will dine on the leftovers). By the way, did you know that King David used to have zebra meat every day for lunch.

Also, Egyptian “pharaohs” are not to be dethroned. You can’t get away from the ‘curse of the mummy’ even if you do reincarnate as a zebra.

signed, ‘that famous Jewish player AG’.

11-21-05
Ah Brad, what a fickle fellow you are.
Leaving your beloved VULTURE opening for the ZEBRA! Is there no stability in this world anymore.
Winged creatures of the world UNITE against such cruel abandonment!!

Art Byers, Secretary
New Mexico Chess Organization
P O Box 4215
Albuquerque NM 87196
secretarynmco@att.net

11-19-05
In response to D. Ingram’s post of 11-18-05: (Dave’s comments in italics)
Hmm, I’m not quite sure just what to add to this ‘discussion’. Class players have always provided the monetary base to U.S. chess, so I
can’t conceive of sleighting them in terms of prizes offered. I would suggest the injection of money into the NM chess scene, through
sponsorship, either corporate or individual.

It’s been done in the past, and there are still people out trying to solicit donations.

However, most chess organizations handle money so poorly, and our state is so poor, I can’t see this realistically happening here.
It seems that chess and money seldom, if ever, intersect in NM.

I guess we’ll just have to settle for playing the game because we enjoy it.

While I applaud the efforts of our NMCO officers in general, volunteers I remind you, I believe they err in holding too many fast
tournaments; we always had a small, but strong scene. Now it seems, we’ll just have a small scene.

Please find me another year where we’ve gotten 100 players at both the Albuquerque Open and the New Mexico Open. The scene,
while still a bit ‘small’, has shown signs of growth.

NMCO sold real chess ‘down the river’ long ago. They should probably relegate themselves to do what they do best; offer quick games
for the non-serious player, to fit in with their schedules.

Not just our schedules, Mr. Ingram, but the schedules of many of our tournament players, who have expressed gratitude at the shorter
days. 12 hours of chess plus one hour of parking and registration plus one hour of breaks between rounds plus driving time is one helluva
long day. The ‘fast’ 2006 Memorial still finds players spending 10 hours a day at the tournament hall, plus driving time. Frankly, I’m surprised
that you have the temerity to call these players ‘non-serious’.

However, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the real reason NM chess, and NMCO itself flounders; it is the fact that a good, strong game
of chess, against a nice opponent, is virtually impossible to find.

Most of my opponents here have been courteous and sportsmanlike. I strongly disagree with your generalization.

-Ryan McCracken

11-18-05
@Dr J
I’m sorry if you got the wrong impression. I never said this forum or any specific post would prevent me from returning. In fact the only real consideration (aside from finishing some chess study I started) is reconciling the reasons I left bridge. I’m still dealing with that, and having not played bridge for 2 months is probably the only reason I started thinking about chess at all. Anyway, I was just making a subtle point about
some of the posts. And, I’m probably out of line for even pointing it out since I haven’t exactly been an active member here.

I should mention that finding this wonderful source of NM chess info was a bit of a hassle. I hit several sites with broken links, and an old
forum. Once I got here, I was impressed with all the info available, and it can only help NM chess to have such resources available.

@Brad
If that’s a stab at me (playing the same opening for white & black), good one. For those who don’t remember or know me, I did exactly that.
Well, except for my last NM open where I had some fun beating people using Phildor’s defense. For the record, if I do come back, I’ll not be
using “ZEBRA CHESS” heh. I looked at your game, pretty good. Unfortunately, I was wrestling with software at the time. Now that I’ve built
my own custom winboard (thank you, open source) and crafty engine, analysis is both easier and better.

Eric

11-18-05
Of course you’re free to decide for yourself
, Eric, but a common-sense approach would be to actually visit or even play
in a single NMCO event before accepting the word of an individual or group of individuals regarding the state of New Mexico chess.
It might be nothing like as bad as you may be led to believe by the comments of a few people on the Forum. The fact that our prizes,
our tournament attendance, and positive comments about our events are all up indicates, at least to first order, that we’re
doing SOMETHING right.

Pleasing all of the people all of the time, however, is something that we’re guaranteed to fail to accomplish.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

11-18-05
Well, I am back. Did you notice my game with Jim Johnston in the latest DK?
I am developing a new style of chess which I call
ZEBRA CHESS. I play exactly the same opening moves whether I am Black or White. I am getting ready for my big match with
that famous Jewish player AG . . . . I want some feed-back on the idea of playing the same system with Black or White. Has anyone else
ever tried it or am I breaking new ground??
Sincerely
Brad Earlewine

11-18-05
Well, Dave,
I can’t say that’s why I left so long ago. But I’ve been following the forums here for a bit, thinking perhaps of returning.
Having read your post and much of this forum, I’m not as excited about it as I was a week ago.
Although it would be nice to see some familiar chess faces.

Eric Mullins

11-18-05
In response to the ongoing time control discussion on this forum
Hmm, I’m not quite sure just what to add to this ‘discussion’. Class players have always provided the monetary base
to U.S. chess, so I can’t conceive of sleighting them in terms of prizes offered. I would suggest the injection of money into
the NM chess scene, through sponsorship, either corporate or individual. However, most chess organizations handle money
so poorly, and our state is so poor, I can’t see this realistically happening here. It seems that chess and money seldom, if ever,
intersect in NM.

Chess culture in the entire U. S. is sadly lacking in comparison to other countries. It would be surprising to me if we ever
had a very large and thriving New Mexico chess scene, let alone a decent chess culture. Our scene is small with a budget
similar in nature. While I applaud the efforts of our NMCO officers in general, volunteers I remind you, I believe they err in holding
too many fast tournaments; we always had a small, but strong scene. Now it seems, we’ll just have a small scene. Too many
fast games will degrade the quality of play.

As far as longer games goes, it is foolish to think that longer games aren’t better, on the whole; the thing speaks for itself.
I also think virtually all players realize this, and is the reason the top players have always played slow time limits to determine
the championship. Quicker time limits cheapen the play, and virtually everybody knows it. In specific, I won’t play anthing less than
40/2 SD/1, and therefore, while a NMCO member currently, it won’t last long. NMCO sold real chess ‘down the river’ long ago.
They should probably relegate themselves to do what they do best; offer quick games for the non-serious player, to fit in with
their schedules. This was the path NMCO took long ago, and they seem determined to follow it to its chessic helpmate.

However, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the real reason NM chess, and NMCO itself flounders; it is the fact that a good,
strong game of chess, against a nice opponent, is virtually impossible to find. Arguments, petty rivalries, and general nastiness
are what drove myself, and virtually all of my former playing partners, from the NMCO ‘scene’ long ago. It seems some players,
both weak and strong, seem to think that playing someone a game of chess gives them license to be rude and abusive. In short,
the insecure, the too-contencious, the petty, and the snarky, took over NMCO long ago.

Dave Ingram
11-17-05
We’re having the Sandia Prep Chessfest on December 10, and we need volunteer floor TD’s.
They only need to know basic tournament rules. Even if they can only be there for a round or two, we’d appreciate it.
If you know of anyone that might be interested, feel free to give them my e-mail address scottkerns@mail.com or
my phone number 280-9824. Thanks!

Scott Kerns

11-16-05
In response to Art Glassman’s post
SORRY ART! I didn’t mention your name because I was speaking of how your statements might be seen by others rather than what your intent was. I could not know your intent, but if other people saw what you wrote and got the idea to avoid a local tournament that would not be good in my opinion. I didn’t mean to attack you for your views. After reading my post I must apologize because I see that it certainly was out of line. You have been nothing but helpful to me since I moved to New Mexico. Let me just say that I am a strong supporter of local organizers and leave it at that. Please accept my apology.

Randy Merrell

11-14-05
In response to Mr. Merrell’s accusation of ‘boycott’
: Mr. Merrell states, “Trying get others to boycott an event by asking them
to go to another state with you is attacking the organizer and his event.” I assume this false accusation is directed at me since I
stated that I was going to play in Colorado in order to play in a tournament with time controls which were not available in NM,
and asked who would like to accompany me. Yes, the statement was made in a dramatic way to get the reader’s attention
But this in no way infers that I am boycotting our local events or trying to get others to due likewise. I have the right to disagree
with the organization of an event even if I am in the minority. That is my version of democracy. We are not waving the flag here
and playing God, Mom, and Apple Pie”. And God bless the ‘organizer’. On the contrary, what you wrote is pure 20th century ‘spin’.
And even worse, “If that becomes the culture of chess in New Mexico (as it was in Missouri for years at the hands of Bill Moushey)…”,
that innuendo of associating my intentions, or their results, with the likes of Bill Moushey (may he rest in peace) is nothing less than
‘McCarthyism!!

“You might want to consider what you want for a end result.”
Yes, I do consider the end result, which is to make New Mexico chess a more vibrant and alive organization open to all. I have
consistently been a goodwill ambassador for New Mexico in my travels and invited people to come play and stay at my home
(almost every tournament has had an out of state player invited to stay with me). I am willing to bring a letter I received before our
last event for your perusal (if you are in attendance) wherein a Coloradoan complains about the faster time control but I argue for him
to come anyway. And he comes. So even though the slow time control bunch seems to be in the minority we still play. And argue and
complain.

Furthermore, New Mexico TD’s are getting paid (courtesy of a progressive New Mexico chess organization), so you and I have a
vested interest in keeping chess alive.

‘Culture’ ,or lack thereof, sure is getting a workout…
Hope you have a sense of humor.

Art Glassman

11-14-05
We have received a letter from a chess player in Greece. He is looking for games on Email and via Correspondence.
He writes that he is a USCF member with a rating of 2104. If you are interested, conact him at alexander_mathiopoulos@yahoo.gr.
There is an “underline” character in the space between his first and last name.

Alexander also expressed interest in playing in one of our over-the-board tournaments. Obviously that means that, on occassion, he does
come to the USA to play. If/when he does show up from almost halfway around the world, I will recommend to the E.B. that we give him
free entry as a good-will gesture.

Art Byers, Secretary
New Mexico Chess Organization
P O Box 4215
Albuquerque NM 87196
secretarynmco@att.net

11-13-05
(In response to the time control discussions beginning 11-01 on this forum)
Chess tournaments exist because of organizers. Organizers who put in a lot of work and risk financial loss to hold an event
for the rest of us. The organizer has the right to hold what ever kind of event he wants. Players have the right not to attend. If the organizer
is not rich chances are he needs a good number of entries to break even. Most organizers have found that prizes = entries. The format of
the tournament will also have a big impact on the turnout. Having local top players attend usually has very little effect on attendance. Any consideration to a local master such as free entry into the tournament or rearranging the position of board one because of lighting
complaints is due to the high degree of chess culture shown by the organizer.

So my point is this. Play or don’t play that is your message to the organizer. Trying get others to boycott an event by asking them to go
to another state with you is attacking the organizer and his event. If that becomes the culture of chess in New Mexico (as it was in Missouri
for years at the hands of Bill Moushey) you could find fewer events for everyone. You might want to consider what you want for a end result.
Randy Merrell
TD, New Mexico Open

11-11-05
Visit the NEW
Desert Knight webpage
:
http://doubleexclam.home.comcast.net/DesertKnight/DK_Webpage.htm
You can download both the reading and printable versions of the DK, plus games in PGN format.
PGN files can be launched with ChessBase or Fritz. Those without a PGN viewer can download ChessBase Light for free.
-Ryan McCracken
Desert Knight Editor

11-08-05
The UNM Chess Club had me scheduled to give a simul for its members on Tuesday, November 22 (and that is the date currently
displayed in the NMCO calendar). Last night they called to ask that this be moved to Monday, November 28, starting at
7 PM.

If you were planning to play in the simul, you should be aware of the date change. You should also probably contact the
UNM Chess Club president, Frances Perrault, at fperraul@unm.edu, to let her know your interest in playing. At some future
chess club meeting date (either in December or next semester in January) I may present
some of the simul games for analysis at my monthly lecture.
Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)

11-06-05 (Robert Haines)
(In response to the time control discussions beginning 11-01 on this forum)
Jesse is absolutely right about New Mexico’s lack of a chess culture. NM chess is set up to cater to the weakest players with
no consideration given to the strongest. Every tournament is a fast time control where the prize fund is distributed to the weakest.
Cash class prizes are not a positive development. They encourage cheating in all its forms, contribute to gambling addictions, and
deny a reward for local titled players who compete. Why are class prizes needed in the top sections? Trophies and plaques should
be sufficient reward for bad chess.

The last couple of years Jesse has been very generous of his time and has played for a pittance in NM events. Why should he even
bother when some bozo who scores in the middle of the group gets paid almost as much as the winner? If you reward mediocrity,
that’s what you produce. Why does NM have only one IM and no GMs? Because we play g/90 and pay for scoring 2-3.

No one is asking for only real chess events. You guys can play your pretend chess most of the time. But is it asking too much for
ONE real chess tournament a year? I’ve been a chess teacher for 35 years now and many of my students have gone on to earn
FIDE titles of all sorts. Without serious events containing only strong players playing each other at real time controls with real prizes
for the winner, this could not have happened. You can’t ask a master to play three games against weakies before he gets to even see
an expert over the board, and expect that master to develop his potential. I could give you a long list of promising NM juniors who have
never grown out of the classes and graduated to the real thing.

Every place I’ve seen this discussion occur, the class player is outraged. They demand their control. “Dance for us Master! Here are
your coins.” If the master doesn’t want to take the abuse, the class player is offended. “Ungrateful snob.” they say. Look, this isn’t about
scoring debating points as some of you seem to think, going through the posts line by line to make your little brownie points. This is
about the future of New Mexico chess. Do you want a culture of strong chess? There is only one way to do it; reward excellence and
provide top level competition.
Robert Haines

11-06-05 (Ryan)
(In response to Robert Haines’ post 11-06)
NM chess is set up to cater to the weakest players with no consideration given to the strongest.

Funny, the last time I checked, the strongest player in the last few NMCO tournaments played for free, and he won
a prize at least double that of any other player.
Cash class prizes are not a positive development. They encourage cheating in all its forms, contribute to
gambling addictions, and deny a reward for local titled players who compete.

And why wouldn’t someone cheat to obtain the first place prize? It’s usually the biggest one, and thus the most
attractive target for a cheat. I guess that the whole US Chess scene must be going down the tubes, since lots of other
states offer tourneys with cash class prizes. Damn! How are we ever going to catch up to the Russians with an attitude
like this?!
Why are class prizes needed in the top sections? Trophies and plaques should be sufficient reward for
bad chess.

As S. Tarrasch said, “One doesn’t have to play well; it’s enough to play better than your opponent.”
The last couple of years Jesse has been very generous of his time and has played for a pittance in NM events.
Why should he even bother when some bozo who scores in the middle of the group gets paid almost as much as
the winner?

See above; he gets free entry to NMCO tournaments, and wins prizes at least double that of any other player.
If you reward mediocrity, that’s what you produce. Why does NM have only one IM and no GMs?
Because we play g/90 and pay for scoring 2-3.

In the past, we used to have lots of events with 40/2, SD/1. Yet somehow, we weren’t producing any GM’s then, either.
Care to explain?
No one is asking for only real chess events. You guys can play your pretend chess most of the time.
Typical (former?!) master arrogance. Do you really expect the mass of lower-rated players to vote for your proposals
with this kind of attitude?!
Every place I’ve seen this discussion occur, the class player is outraged. They demand their control.
“Dance for us Master! Here are your coins.”

Still way more coins than anyone else gets. Many of Bill Goichberg’s tournaments attract lots of GM’s, yet still have
good class prizes. Sandbagging is a problem, to be sure, but you run the risk of people cheating when you offer any prize,
especially now that there are pocket computers that play at master level.
If the master doesn’t want to take the abuse, the class player is offended. “Ungrateful snob.” they say.
I think that the first prize should indeed be the highest prize in the tournament. However, it’s unreasonable to expect the
~90% of players that have no realistic chance to win 1st prize to plunk down $30-$35, with no chance of getting anything
back. This would only hurt attendance and lead to less $$ for everyone.
-Ryan McCracken

11-07-05 (Art Byers)
Here is my view of the on-going discussion taking place on the forum.
#1: The Executive Board Listens to constructive ideas ! Not only from the lower rated players but also from the highest ones .At the November 1st meeting of the NMCO E.B., and at the instigation of President Jeffrey Burch, a very serious discussion took place about running a closed invitational for 6 or 8 top New Mexico rated players. Lack of Money is the big stumbling block. We need to find one or more sponsors who will finance such a tournament or obtain smaller donations from many individuals, and quite a few local (New Mexico) businesses. I raised this point at the annual meeting, asking if any member present had a corporate contact from who we could obtain grants. Depending on the success of fundraising, it will occur sooner or later. A realistic target date could be Fall, 2006. It is important not only to raise enough to give worthwhile prizes to the top finishers in such a closed invitational, but also to give each player reasonable “appearance money” to help defray their expenses. Within the limits of my age (79) and health, I am going to do my part to raise funds to make the closed tournament happen.

#2. Consider this: If only experts, masters, international masters and grand masters belonged to and played in USCF rated tournaments – there would be no USCF and no New Mexico Chess Organization. Chess in the United States is supported by those who play what Mr. Haines, rather arrogantly, called “pretend chess”. Without the great love of this challenging game and the participation by those who play at below expert strength, there would be no New Mexico chess tournaments. The rank and file players are the ones that pay the bills and therefore, justifiably, have more control in the NMCO. However, it is my firm belief that the rank and file would be very much interested in seeing the NMCO promote a closed invitational. I believe many would be willing to buy spectator tickets as a means of support for our best players.

#3. Saturday, November 5 – at the Westside Chess club , I had some discussion about a closed tournament with Arthur Glassman because I was interested in hearing his views on how such a tournament should be run and the criteria for extending invitations. For a closed tournament, assuming eight players in a seven round , round robin, the players would have to agree on a playing schedule – be it one round or two rounds a day or a mix of both. Obviously, the time length of the tournament would affect the amount of money needed. Hiring rooms and separate space for spectators costs $$.

#4 and last: Please remember that the NMCO is run by dedicated UNPAID VOLUNTEERS. It boggles my mind when I think about the huge number of hours put in by President Jeffrey Burch, DK Editor Ryan McCracken and Tournament Organizer Scout Veitch. At each of the last two tournaments, NMCO treasurer, Dean Brunton, had to process almost a hundred entries and all the receipts involved. (That’s a lot of work!!) Those hundreds of entries are proof that the NMCO volunteers are doing something right!! When call was made, at the annual meeting, for other volunteers to come forward to help or for others to be nominated for office to run the NMCO – not one hand was raised. Think about that!

Jeffrey Burch has stated, publicly – over and over – that the meetings of the Executive board are open to any NMCO member. We need your input. If you want to attend the December 6th E.B. meeting, please send me Email at secretarynmco@att.net or leave a message on my answering machine – 505-323-2433 and I will see that you are notified, well in advance, of the time and place.

Art Byers, Secretary
New Mexico Chess Organization
P O Box 4215
Albuquerque NM 87196
secretarynmco@att.net

11-06-05
Click for Art Byers’ review of the newly released Fritz 9.

 

11-04-05
Hello all: good job Art finally provoking a discussion on the new forum… also congrats to the NMCO officers for an awesome tournament last weekend. Great turnout. As the quizmaster I was impressed by the number of folks who featured in the quiz who showed up at the NM Open. It would be cool if some of them could submit answers for the quiz. Kraai always says it’s too tough, even though he features in a bunch of questions and ought to adds quiz title to his many others…For those of you who wish to send in answers here is some help…..turn to page 49 in your DK magazine…..Q1 well the kids have all moved on, but the old men who played Browne Fischer and Reshevsky were all there, though none of them played. The guys who beat Kosten, tied with Benko and helped Donaldson all played in the Open section. Q3 and 7 just click your mouse to Member services. For Internet handles check out the old forum (if you can get on), the only handles not on the forum were Moorknight and Chessmasterbacon… they both played in the Open section. Also playing were Welshman, Macheide, and Heliopolitanus. Dazzler came to watch on Saturday and Double Exclam came on Sunday. Can’t find the chess novel? You should check out an old forum posting by MeisterZinger. I would go on but that would make it too easy. Hope you can find some answers and email them to me. Don’t worry if you have to guess them… that’s all part of the fun. Guess well!
Jim Johnston


11-04-05

Jesse talks about his fifth game from the NM Open on chesslecture.com. (This is a pay-per-month site, but it’s a good one). The games change daily, but all of his talks on the site are archived, so you can look them up. I’ll put that same game up on nmchess in the interactive viewer shortly.
Susan

— — The following post has provoked several responses — —
Scroll down to see them all; hit refresh each time you return to the page to get the latest

11-01-05 (Art)
Slow Chess vs. Fast Chess
I just looked at the recently posted schedule for the Memorial/Senior tournament. I was hoping to have an opportunity to play
a game of ‘traditional’ slow chess. Now I must travel to Colorado this December in order to have that chance.
It has been over a year since NMCO decided to try faster time controls after a closely divided vote. But I thought that diversity
was the goal. But all three of our major tournaments?!. The winter tournament with only four rounds, and hence more time
available, has always been the place for serious players to get a chance to play a quality endgame.
I am aware of the fact that we have had a larger turnout this last year but is that due specifically to the faster time controls
or the excellent website and more advertising?. Also much of the increase was among the lower rated players. There was
no increase in the A, Ex. or Master categories. And if the faster controls was due to site availability then why not hold the
tournament at the Mariott since NMCO liked that site and wanted to diversify. Not every event has to be about maximizing
the prize fund (you can still have a large first prize and cut down on the other prizes). In my opinion, I don’t think the seniors
playing in the Memorial/Senior event have money as their major reason for playing.

So lets hope the weather holds and we can travel to Colorado for a traditional game of chess.
Sincerely,
Art Glassman

11-01-05 (Jesse)
Art is completely correct.
Advertising G/2 is like saying our state has no chess culture.

A further point on which I thought we had already agreed last year: we agreed that U/1600 was too low a cutoff
to allow for a decisive winner in the open section. Ie. so many will now play in the open that four rounds
will not easily produce a decisive winner. I thought we had agreed to over 2000 with exceptions being made
for junior players.
Jesse

11-02-05 (Jeff)
Jesse has previously told me that any tournament which holds more than one round per day
is not serious chess. For an IM this might be true, but our NMCO membership consists mostly
of non-IMs. We just haven’t had a large demand for games of the 40/90 and G/1 format or
slower.

I remember discussing the possibility of a ratings cutoff at 1600 with Jesse last year, but I
certainly don’t remember agreeing to it. We spoke to several individuals, asking that they
consider moving down from the Open to lower sections, but the response is the same one
which I would have given if asked – I play in chess tournaments in order to play the better
players, not to avoid them. We could try to force people to play in lower sections by creating
high ratings requirements, but that’s the surest way there is to lose entries. NMCO should
not be trying to tell people what’s best for them despite their desires – I don’t want to head
an organization which does that.

Jesse and I agree on one point – we both think four rounds is ridiculous for such tournaments.
I tried to years to persuade Art to increase it to 5 rounds, either with faster time limits, or
use of Friday evening games, or moving the tournament to a 3-day weekend. He never, to
the best of my recollection, suggested limiting the number of players in the top section. In
deference to Art’s wishes, we have kept most of the format which he used when he was
directing the Memorial, but not all. Our tournaments are Open, and as long as they are Open
we won’t artificially micromanage the sections to omit players who could have an impact on the
result. I point repeatedly to the magnificent performance of a 1600 rated Scott Kerns several
years ago in our state championship. He defeated or drew a nearly-all-expert field, myself
included, to win the title. This sort of thing doesn’t happen very often, but with Jesse’s format,
Scott wouldn’t even have been entered into a NM Memorial section with a high rating cutoff,
despite having proven he could handle it.

Finally, we never agreed to a permanent 2000 cutoff for the NM Memorial – this was a
one-time only format, done to honor Tom Keffer during the year that he died. There
was never any intention to maintain that (if that was Art’s hope, he neglected to mention
it to me). The intention was to hold a separate New Mexico Closed event for our best players
(although several have indicated a lack of interest, or tepid interest at best), and to allow
them to fight it out with slow, high-level chess. We’re still talking to them about this.

If the membership of NMCO wants to make the types of changes suggested by Art and Jesse,
then they should:
a) make this known during our annual business meeting (it wasn’t brought up this year),
b) call, write, or e-mail your opinions to the NMCO officers. Thus far, we’ve been told
that our existing tournaments and their formats are enjoyable, and no one has suggested
major changes except for Art and Jesse, and
c) attend the NMCO officer meetings and tell us your opinions. But be prepared for the
possibility that you might think you have a good idea, but that it would not be favored by
either the organization or the majority of the players because they’d prefer something else.
Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

11-02-05 (Jesse)
I don’t think four rounds is ridiculous. I think it’s great! I only think it’s bad if we don’t make
a higher cut. Please note that someone rated 1600 is not prohibited from joining the open.
All that is needed is that we make the reserve section something like 1200-1900 or even 1800
and the open section will be small enough to make four rounds work. This is what we agreed on
at last year’s memorial. Long live the NM Forum!
Jesse

11-02-05 (Ryan)
In response to Art Glassman’s post of 11/1:
(Art’s original statements are in bold)
It has been over a year since NMCO decided to try faster time controls after a closely divided vote. But I thought that
diversity was the goal. But all three of our major tournaments?!. The winter tournament with only four rounds, and
hence more time available, has always been the place for serious players to get a chance to play a quality endgame.
– –
The two-stage time control is what forces players to save time for the endgame, but it seems a needless restriction. I would prefer
G/3 over 40/2, SD/1 (if those were the only choices), simply because some games don’t last until the endgame. If the game is going
to be decided in the middlegame, then the players should be allowed to spend the lion’s share of their time on that part of the game.

I am aware of the fact that we have had a larger turnout this last year but is that due specifically to the faster time controls
or the excellent website and more advertising?. Also much of the increase was among the lower rated players. There was
no increase in the A, Ex. or Master categories.
– –
Then again, if there was no decrease among the A, Ex. or Master categories, it indicates they’ll still play despite the faster controls.
I don’t see the downside.

And if the faster controls was due to site availability then why not hold the tournament at the Mariott since NMCO liked that
site and wanted to diversify. Not every event has to be about maximizing the prize fund (you can still have a large first prize
and cut down on the other prizes).
– –
I’m strongly against gutting class prizes just to have a fat first prize. The class players ought to have a good shot at some decent
money in return for their entry fee. Otherwise, they’re just paying the site rental and donating money to their local master.

In my opinion, I don’t think the seniors playing in the Memorial/Senior event have money as their major reason for playing.
– –
A common senior complaint (from what I’ve read in Chess Life) is that they lose games in the final hour, due to fatigue. Playing two
6-hour games in a day exacerbates the problem. I’m a relative young ‘un, and 8-9 hours per day already seems like a large time
commitment.

-Ryan McCracken

In response to Jesse’s post of 11/1:
“Advertising G/2 is like saying our state has no chess culture.”

What an absurd statement. The Memorial will still consist of two full (8 hour) days of chess, which equals the average workday.
When I think of a ‘cultural’ event, I envision the Santa Fe Russian Festival from last year. Oddly enough, there were no 6-hour games
at that event. I don’t see why super-lengthy games are needed to maintain a ‘chess culture’.

-Ryan McCracken

11-02-05 (Jeff)
I must confess to being surprised at Art’s complaint regarding time limit. Four hours for a game of chess doesn’t
impress me as being particularly quick, especially when we have used G/90 for several tournaments. Diversity is indeed a goal:
the Albuquerque Open has been moved to G/90, the NM Open had G/90 and G/2 games, and the Memorial/Senior has the
slowest time limits at G/2. This is in response to the request of our membership, and the feedback I’ve received (as well as
the tournament numbers) has been positive. No one has been complaining that the time limits are too fast — until now.
Perhaps Art thinks that people are just dying to play long, slow endgames on a cold winter’s day, but that’s not the commentary
we are receiving. People are thankful that they are able to go home earlier each day of the tournament.

Checking an upcoming Colorado tournament in March, it appears they have 40/90 then G/1 for their first 3 rounds (that’s
15 hours of chess in a single day, folks), then 40/2 and G/1 for the last 2 rounds (12 hours). Do you think New Mexico players
really want to play 5 and 6 hours for an individual game? Thus far in my 5 years as VP and President of NMCO, no one has
asked for these kind of time limits. Players have attended the Memorial in the past, but many have done so because it is
one of the few tournaments our state holds, not because of the nature of the time limit. Similarly, Art and I must agree to
disagree regarding the vote at the 2004 NMCO business meeting: when it came to faster time limits, I don’t remember this
being a close vote. A few favored retaining slow time limits, but it wasn’t a large number.

While I’d like to give credit to our excellent website and more advertising for the increase in attendance between the 2004 and
2005 NM Memorial Tournaments (we had a total of 73 attendees in 2004 compared to 92 in 2005), the fact is that this tournament
has been pretty heavily advertised (by Art and the our page) for years. My distinct impression was the latest increase was due
to: a) everyone’s devotion to Tom Keffer and their desire to honor him, and b) the prize fund, which was huge thanks to a
magnificent donation by Tom’s mother. Players tolerated the slow time limit, but no one was particularly enthusiastic about it.
Very, very few games went the distance in time. Something Art did not mention regarding the size of the top section was the
fact that there was a requirement of being at least expert level or higher (or a former expert) in 2005, a stringent requirement
which we did not have in previous year, which kept numbers down.

As for holding the tournament at other locations and not maximizing the prize fund, we did this for the Albuquerque Open.
It was considered that both the Memorial and NM Open were more ‘serious’ tournaments which should have maintained
higher prizes and slower games. There is roughly $1300 difference in cost between the Marriott and the UNM SUB. I leave it
as a simple exercise to the readers to determine whether this amount of money, which could have been turned into prize
money or other organization expenditures, would make no difference to the chessplayers of New Mexico. Money may not
be the primary motivating factor for participants in the NM Memorial/Senior, but it sure hasn’t hurt. For the sake of diversity,
we held the 2005 Albuquerque Open at the Marriott (which everybody seemed to enjoy), but it cost us heavily, and while we’ll
probably do it again, we can’t make a habit of it.

The Memorial/Senior is still several months off, but I doubt very much if attendance will be hurt by the time limit, and I really
doubt whether very many New Mexico chessplayers will avoid it and travel instead to Colorado tournaments where they can
play 5 or 6 hour individual games. We will try to organize a New Mexico Close for our top players with very slow time limits,
but that’s a separate tournament entirely.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

11-03-05
Long live the forum!

First, Am I not right in thinking that the reason the Memorial has two rounds a day in the first place is because guys like Art thought we could then have longer time controls and a more temperate playing schedule for those of us not seeking a heart attack? Doesn’t the G/2 simply controvert this intention?

Chess Culture aka Schachkultur, to be translated as showing respect for the game. It is reflected in our board manners and the conditions in which we play.
Jesse – good to see a discussion again

11-03-05
In response to Jesse’s post of 11/3/2005:
The NM Open had only two rounds on Sunday, just like the Memorial will. G/2 was used on Sunday at the NM Open, which is
the state championship, so G/2 should suffice for the Memorial also.

Going to a G/2 TC is not ‘showing a lack of respect’ — as I have pointed out, two G/2 in a day is like putting a full day in the office.
Besides. respect is in the mind of the player; certain players take even their blitz (g/5 min or less) games very seriously, while
others play even the slowest time controls cavalierly.
Ryan McCracken

11-03-05 (Art)
Additional comments and clarifications (I hope).

When I was a tournament organizer I always tried to diversify the tournament formats and tried everything I could think of.
Some ideas successful, some not.
The reason for a four round tournament was exactly as Jesse noted in his last post. I had originally organized such an event in the past
to have a once a year break from the five round events (since some players felt obligated, for whatever reason, to not take a ‘bye’). I then
created three sections according to the number of players likely to play in each section so as to be able to determine a clear winner
(please check back to the previous tournaments). It should not take an IM to calculate that the current section cutoffs may not achieve
that goal. And I reiterate what Jesse said, that if the second section was U/1900 then any 1600 player could still play in the upper open
section. But I think many would be quite happy to play in the U/1900. Not everyone is entering to play a master. Some just want
competition against someone that they have a chance against, else everyone would be playing in the open section. The ‘closed’
top section in the Keffer Memorial was special to that event, although I am in favor or having such events. Just my opinion, again,
in contrast to what Jeff wrote.

Also, in regard to all the discussion about numbers, I believe that not all tournaments need to be about maximizing the number of
participants. Quality events and conditions are also a part of ‘chess culture’. Right On, Jesse!
Regarding the fact that chess tournaments are exhausting, I agree. However this is a once a year event so people should prepare
themselves mentally and physically just as one would for a once a year marathon race. I personally have no sympathy for whining
about it so that one can get home quicker to watch their favorite football team. If chess is a fun thing for a few hours or a day, then
play only in those events. And yes, as Ryan notes, seniors, as well as others, make mistakes in those final hours. I was also not
suggesting that every tournament should be only about supporting the top master and paying the site fee. However in regard to the
Memorial, if I understood correctly, it was moved later in the month so that there wouldn’t be any time conflicts with the UNM site,
Unfortunately this will eliminate many college students who will be in school out of state . For example, the Calhoun brothers who
always love to play and give our events much character. Hence my suggestion about another venue. But I would not have supported
paying an extra $1300 for that site. I think it is well known that I was very fiscally responsible as a tournament organizer.
In years past I used to prepare the tournament format (without the site if it was not yet known) and advertise it well in advance of the
USCF submission date at the Frontier club and whenever possible months ahead in the DK (the NMCO site did not yet exist). This
gave people a chance to comment on the format. This has not been the case recently. We are not aware of the format until it is to late
to change it. I did not see a suggested format for the Memorial posted to the NMCO site. Obviously feed back that is unpopular will not
effect a change and in this case if everyone wants the faster controls, then I’m sure NMCO would abide by those wishes.
I personally am still in favor of the slower control. And not just because it allows one more time for an engame. That is only
one point and made more for rhetorical purposes. It was not my intent to nitpick.

Because players still play in the tournament does not necessarily mean they agree with the format, as Ryan suggested in his reply.
Many years ago (early 90’s) Spencer Lower, a well known master and editor of the DK at the time, wrote an editorial in the DK
disagreeing with an issue regarding time controls where he stated that he was a hard core chess player and would play no matter
what an organizer threw his way but that doesn’t mean he agreed or liked it..
Sincerely,
Art Glassman

11-03-05 (Ryan)
In response to Art Glassman’s 11/3 post (Glassman’s comments in bold)
Also, in regard to all the discussion about numbers, I believe that not all tournaments need to be about maximizing
the number of participants.
Promoting chess means getting more people involved in playing tournament chess. Turnout is very important, especially for our
‘big three’ tournaments. And I’m still not convinced that G/2 harms the quality of the games. As DK Editor, I did not see a marked change in quality from events G/2 or even G/90 versus 40/2 SD/1; the main difference is that the 40/2 control causes blunders
right before move 40, whereas pure-SD leads to blunders at the end.

Regarding the fact that chess tournaments are exhausting, I agree. However this is a once a year event so people
should prepare themselves mentally and physically just as one would for a once a year marathon race. I personally
have no sympathy for whining about it so that one can get home quicker to watch their favorite football team. If chess
is a fun thing for a few hours or a day, then play only in those events.
That’s a great idea. The 1st Annual “Play ’till You Drop!” event! It’s held at a site that has no parking, just bicycle racks. Play
begins at 5:00AM sharp, and continues indefinitely. The winner is the last one still awake. He gets all the money left over after
the site and TD are paid for.
. Seriously, the time control’s not going to help football fans much. Most football games are played Sun. afternoon, and the last
round starts at 3pm. However, it does help the out-of-towners a bit. Someone from Santa Fe already has a 1.5 hour drive each
way to get here. Add 8 hours of chess (two G/2’s), an hour parking/registering/setting up pieces, and a 1 hour lunch, and you’ve
got a 13-hour day. Is this person a ‘whiner’ if they object to an even longer day?

Because players still play in the tournament does not necessarily mean they agree with the format, as Ryan suggested
in his reply.
I suggested no such thing. It’s not possible to please everyone, and right now, feedback indicates that players are overall satisfied
with the faster controls.

I was also not suggesting that every tournament should be only about supporting the top master and paying the site fee.
Nevertheless, that’s the result you’ll get if, in your words, you “have a large first prize, and cut down on the other prizes.”
-Ryan McCracken

10-25-05
It’s not too late to pre-register for the NM Open. You can register in person at the UNM Chess Club meeting tonight (10/25)
or at the Coronado Chess Club on Wednesday (10/26). You save a few bucks and can sleep in a little later on Saturday!

Dean Brunton
(505) 241-2618
dbrunto@pnm.com

10-16-05
Monte Vista Elementary (located near UNM) has an immediate need for a semi-experienced chess coach
for their Chess Club, which currently has 2nd through 5th graders in it. (Applicants are already being interviewed.)
Numbers in the club would be expected to be 20-30 kids total, of which you’d share coaching duties with one other
chess coach. Applicant would have good child-management skills (general even temperment, patience, ability to manage
a number of kids at one time) as well as have intermediate chess skills and knowledge. Would work once per week
(Mondays: 3:45 – 5:15). Pay would be up to $12 per our, based upon applicant profile and experience. Questions:
please contact: laurablalock@yahoo.com

10-23-05
Big Thanks to everyone who came out to help at the Monte Vista Chess Tournament on 10/15. Thank you to all the community and club chess coaches, both adult and scholastic, who lent their support to this event — Art Glassman, Tom Blog, Ron Kensek, Rod Avery,Gayla Walden (Hughes), Dean Brunton, Claire Jarmosevich, Mike Fontanarosa, Dale Gibbs, Jeff Burch, the Koenigs for their forum, and to Jeff Dunning, who made lots of updates for the tourney on his webpage. And of course, thanks to all those parents who helped out.
The Monte Vista Chess Club

10-13-05
Hi All,
The Georgia O’Keefe Chess Club started our school year two weeks ago. The club is run by myself
and another parent volunteer. We are seeking an experienced chess player volunteer to teach strategy to the kids.
We have missed the deadline to apply for funding to compensate such an individual for their time, however we may
be able to re-apply in January.

We have limited ourselves to a smaller group than in previous years. Our roster is made up of the following grade
levels KG : 3 students, 1st : 2, 2nd : 3, 3rd : 6, 4th : 2, 5th : 1 We meet every Monday, but if your schedule only
allows you to visit us once or twice a month we will still welcome you. No APS background check is required.
We have two parent volunteers to supervise. If you are interested in helping us out, please contact me.
Peter Blemel
296 5445

10-06-05
The NMCO Executive Board
for the past few months has been discussing proposed changes to our Constitution.
We’ve been operating slightly differently in some minor ways from the manner prescribed in our current Constitution,
which hasn’t been updated significantly in a number of years. We want our Constitution to reflect current realities of
chess in New Mexico, and to reflect modifications which we believe will make our operations more fair, more flexible,
and simpler.

After a great deal of discussion and compromise, we’ve come up with a proposed new version. Bylaws, which were
explicitly called out in the previous version, have now been compiled as well. We will shortly be posting the proposed
new Constitution on our web site – I ask all NMCO members in the coming weeks to read it, compare it to the previous
version, and see if they are supportive of the changes. If there
needs to be discussion of significant points, we encourage the use of the NM Chess Forum for such conversations.

We will ask the membership to vote on this new Constitution at the NMCO Annual Business Meeting to be held at
2 PM on the Sunday of the upcoming NM Open.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
505-857-0096 (home)
505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

10-04-05
Let Chucky In!
It is well known that New Mexico and Colorado players love the French due to influence of some great
local players/teachers. Therefore could not resist the following piece of chess art. So all you French Lovers: pour a good
glass of wine, sit back and enjoy watching a 2700 turn a 2600 into ‘french fries’. Anonymous

Forget having Kramnik play in San Luis and let Vassily Ivanchuk in instead. The Chuckster has his rating up to 2752 and
looks set to add a pile more points. He just scored 6/7 for Polonia Plus in the Euro Cup (admittedly on board 2 behind the
solid Boris Gelfand). As usual, his games were great. I attached his win over Volkov for the Black Belt. What a game. He
gives up a knight right out of the opening for long-term pressure against Black’s open king and keeps creating threats and
nabbing pawns for the next 30 moves until Volkov collapses. Don’t show this game to any beginner students; they’ll never
respect the value of the pieces again. From chessninja.com

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2752) – Volkov,Sergey (2622) [C13] 21st European Club Cup Saint Vincent (6.3), 2005
1.e4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.d4 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxe4 5.Nxe4 Be7 6.Bxf6 gxf6 7.Nf3 f5 8.Nc3 a6 9.g3 b5 10.Bg2 Bb7 11.0-0 c5
12.d5 b4 13.dxe6 bxc3 14.exf7+ Kf8 15.Qe2 cxb2 16.Rad1 Qb6 17.Rfe1 Qf6 18.c3 Be4 19.Nh4 Nc6 20.Bxe4 fxe4
21.Qxe4 Rd8 22.Rb1 Rd2 23.Nf3 Rd6 24.Rxb2 Kxf7 25.Rb6 Ke8 26.Re3 Rf8 27.Qxh7 Rf7 28.Qg8+ Rf8 29.Qc4 a5
30.Kg2 Rf7 31.Qxc5 Kf8 32.Qh5 Kg8 33.Qg4+ Rg7 34.Qc4+ Rf7 35.Qg4+ Rg7 36.Qc8+ Bf8 37.Re8 Rg6 38.h4 Qf7
39.Rb7 Qf6 40.Ng5 Ne5 41.Rf7 1-0

 

9-29-05
NEW: ADULT BUGHOUSE!
New section added for October 15th Monte Vista BugHouse Competition for collegiate and adult players!! Limited to the first 50 players (25 Bughouse Teams)!. Same times and rules apply as for regular BugHouse at Monte Vista Bughouse Competition. Trophy to top 3 adult Bughouse teams. Pre-registration for Adult Section HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Questions? See details for Oct. 15th Monte Vista K-12 Chess Tournament at: www.nmsco.org, Upcoming Events.
Laura Blalock

9-24-05
Come watch Jesse Kraai attempt to complete the 2005 Grand Slam of NMCO chess tournaments at the New Mexico Open. Jesse has won this year’s Memorial, Albuquerque Open and Blitz tournaments. The NM Open title would give him the sweep for 2005.
— It’s not too early to send in your registration for the Open! For info look in the Upcoming Events section of this web site.

Jesse did win the 2004 Open; so he now holds all four titles simultaneously. But it doesn’t appear that anyone has won all three (Open, Albuquerque Open and Memorial) titles in the same year. Tom Keffer came close in 2003 — winning the Albuquerque and Memorial tournaments and finishing second in the NM Open.

Does anyone have information of a successful Slam in years prior to the records here on the web site?
Dean Brunton

9-22-05
Hey Everyone,
Just to clarify, the UNM lecture will be this Tuesday the 27th with Mr. Burch.
Sorry for the confusion. If you can, bring in an old chess game you played so that you have a chance to have it analyzed by Mr. Burch. If there are any more questions, keep them coming. Bring your friends and anyone who is interested in sitting in for the lecture. I hope to see you all there!
Sincerely,
Frances Perrault
UNM Chess Club

9-18-05
Please give a look to chesslecture.com. Besides getting to hear an old boar like me, there are other more groovy voices to listen to. I’ve also covered a NM game in my lecture on the Halloween Gambit!
Jesse

9-17-05
Who won the Foothillls tournament? If someone can send me section winners’ names, I’ll post them on the website.
Susan

*** It’s here! the USCF crosstable (thank you Ron)
Congratulations to the winners: Quad 1 David Langlois, Quad 2 Brad Earlewine, Quad 3 Emre Enginarlar, Quad 4 Todd Smirnow, Quad 5 Thomas Blog, Scholastic Section 1 John Aragon, Scholastic 2 Norman Padilla

9-19-05
The results for the “September Knights Quadrangular” tournament have been submitted to USCF and the tournament has been rated. The results now posted at the following link:http://www.uschess.org/msa/XtblMain.php?200509107351.0

Note that Quad 1 is listed as having 5 players. The correct games and results are shown for this quad. Unfortunately, there is no way to delete an entry in a section and I inadvertently added a fifth player to the first quad when I was entering it. I checked with USCF about this and opted for their suggestion to put player 5’s games as unplayed.

David Gardner
President, King’s Knights Chess Club
(505) 866-6409 (home)
djjjg@swcp.com

 

9-7-05
Come join Monte Vista Chess Club for their second annual Chess and Bughouse Tournament on Saturday, October 15th. . Both the Tournament and the BugHouse are for K – 12th grade players. A good time will be had by all (hopefully!). More details? click here. Coaches interested in being Floor TDs: please write to discuss floor TDing in exchange for free bughouse for some of your players.
Laura Blalock

8-31-05
Please pass this information to your clubs or local chess contacts…
New Mexico chess personality Art Glassman will make his television debut (is this correct Art, or have you already appeared before?)
on the ABC Family Channel’s Wildfire series. His episode, “The Track”, is scheduled to be broadcast as part of
a Wildfire marathon on Monday, September 5 (Labor Day) at 5 PM. Note that Comcast recently changed its channel lineup –
ABC Family Channel used to be channel 35, but they are currently channel 59. You might check the listings as
well – this episode was initially scheduled to be shown at 3 PM but is now listed at 5 PM in our time zone. Art plays a down-and-out former jockey, and will be seen (in a non-speaking role) playing a game of chess against someone at the track…
Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch) President, NMCO

*** Art’s appearance ended up in a different episode of Wildfire, shown that day and at other times. We will try to link at least a few seconds of the episode here shortly.

8-26-05
Westside Club’s officer elections are tomorrow [Saturday 8/27] at the Westside Club, 2 pm at their usual North Valley Library
meeting site.
Dr J (Jeffrey Neil Burch) President, NMCO
*** There are new volunteers for president, webmaster and other positions. Please come out to vote.


8-28-05
YES, IT WAS A GOOD DAY at Westside.
In attendance we had Scott Kerns, Dale Diamond, Jeff Burch, Rodelio Ronquillo, Wayne Hatcher, Art Glassman, Dale Gibbs, Brad Earlewine and self. The club decided that each Saturday will have a theme. Next Saturday will be a day of casual play; other Saturdays will have Blitz play, Quads, Lectures, Simuls, and other fun activities, plus a student’s weekend (adults must be present to supervise). Club members will be allowed to sell their used books and other chess related items. Brad will be our ambassador to the community, because of his many social contacts. Members are encouraged to tell officers of any concerns.
Rod Avery
President, Westside Chess Club

8-25-05
The diagram listed Schwarman vs. Sandager has been frusterating me and my brother Peter for quite some time. We both began analyzing it trying desperately to find the “right” move for white. The problem was, it seems that ANY move leads to an advantage except the
incredibly blatantlt bad ones like Bb4. I mean at this point in the game black’s attack is kind of puttering down (I mean what’s his
plan??? Wait for white to stop defending g2???) and white has more queenside space and so the endgame is won. Simply Bd2 is winning, as
is g5, Qa3, Qc1 and anything else not losing material (and no move wins substantial material or checkmates but rather gains an awesome
long term endgame advantage which is already there). So finally we looked it up on Fritz 8 and checked the DK… sure enough g5
wins…eventually…. but according to Fritz “Bd2” is slightly better (and any other move is comparable).

I want a dramatic crusher! The position is like: “White’s a pawn up… make a move that doesn’t lose (more than one solution)”
Schwarman played well but the great move must have been somewhere in getting to this kingside-is-blockaded position, not after this
position was reached.

That’s all I really had to say besides thank you, Ryan, for doing the DK…
I know it’s a lot of work and it’s appreciated.
Luke Calhoun

Schwarman v. Sandager
8-26-05
I suspect that the choice of diagram was influenced by the June ’05 DK issue
(I showed the position after 44.g5), so I’ll elaborate on diagram placement.

Many of the diagrams are indeed placed at a ‘turning’ point in the game – a place when one side can play a move that grabs a major advantage or escapes a difficult position, etc. Such a diagram works like a puzzle within the game.

However, not all diagrams need to be a ‘puzzle’. Some simply show the end result of a gradual transition in advantage. They are the kind of position that a player sees and wonders, “How did things go so wrong??”. In this particular game, there was no crude blunder that doomed black, but rather some missed opportunities on the Queenside. The placement of the diagram underlined the end result of this change by showing the visually impressive pawn wall that White had built. It also followed the comments of the annotator (R. Haines), who gave 44.g5 an “!” and commented, “White has played the last few moves very strongly. Black hangs by a thread.”

Ryan McCracken

8-23-05
Here are the results of the 1st Annual Santa Fe Quads. 21 players, 4 quads and one 6 person swiss. Results have been rated and posted at USCF. Prize money of $20/$10/$5 was distributed to each section.
Best,
Tom Blog

8-03-05
USCF Blitz Rules for the Blitz Championship (Saturday, August 13th in Santa Fe) are at BLITZ . Dean says that we have 10 entries so far (I’ll post the list of names in a few days.) The max for this tournament is 40 players due to space and table rentals, so sign up soon.
– Susan

8-06-05
Blitz Flyer is now UPDATED
with the current list of entries. A map to the park in Santa Fe will be added to it shortly. Hit your refresh button each time you check to get the latest.
– Susan

7-28-05
While we were packing up at the July 17 chess picnic, we discovered a couple of items left behind by attendees. One was a purple water bottle (looked very new), and the other was a huge cartoon-decorated blue mug (which looked like it could have held about a gallon of liquid). If either of these items belongs to you, let me know and we’ll work out arrangements to get it back to you.

Several of us had dinner last night with Alexey Root (who had a short break from her teaching duties at Hummingbird Camp). She continued to gush about how much she enjoyed the picnic. Next year we might ask her to conduct a brief simul there.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)

7-19-05
In Albuquerque right now (Tuesday night-Wed. am), and will be again next Tues.-Wed. (26-27th). First, Elliott Higgins of Hummingbird has Tues-Wed. off, so has brought me down to Alb. Sorry I can’t be down during the Wed. chess club night. I will visit Alb. again next week. Second, thank you so much for including me in your picnic! As I drove off, I thought about how magical the picnic was: tablecloths with chessboard patterns, a chess cake, chocolate chess pieces, lush green grass and trees, and smiles everywhere. I remarked to my children that we were truly fortunate to be part of such an occasion, and that other state chess federations didn’t have such wonderful events. Then, as I contined to drive, it occurred to me: Such magic must be part of the reason that New Mexico is “the Land of Enchantment.” NM chess people turned an ordinary day into a magical one.Sincerely, Alexey Root <aroot@utdallas.edu> BUT it turns out I can only check email once a week when I come down to Albuquerque. So call me at Elliott Higgins or at Hummingbird with any timely messages. P.S. Yes, I would love to come to your picnic again next year. I will be back for more music and chess camp next year.

7-18-05
I’d like to thank
everybody involved with the picnic.  It was a very enjoyable afternoon. In regards to Robert Haines’s excellent annotations in the latest Desert Knight, I have some comments to add.  The master Sandager kicked me around like a tin can for almost 40 moves during our game of round 2.  I felt I knew what a turkey feels like on Thanksgiving eve.  My problem was in the opening; 1.e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Ne4 5.Ne2 Bg4….during my opening preparation I knew this line led to a slight advantage for white, but I didn’t like the doubled pawns, but thought oh well.  During the game I spent considerable time considering the alternatives, but obviously came up short.  The result was similar to Napoleon’s retreat from Russia.  Fortunately, I lulled my opponent to sleep with my bad play and after many hours of torture and severe time trouble I snuck one through.  I went home and prayed to the Chess Gods about what I should have done…the answer was enlightening.  Mr. Haines didn’t mention it in his analysis of the game.  If any player would like to see it they are invited to play that line against players of Socorro…..Our motto: “You don’t mess with the bean, you mess with the whole burrito.”  Again I’d like to thank Robert Haines for his insight, the game was far too painful for me to look at again.

Regards, Mark Schwarman

7-18-05
Wanted to thank all the people who made the recent chess picnic possible – Ramzi and friends for picking up and dropping off the tables/chairs, Susan Koenig for bringing additional food/drinks, all those who helped us set up and tear down, and everyone else who attended. And a big thanks to Alexey for coming by and being so friendly with all our members – if she continues to work at Hummingbird, we may have to make her attendance a regular feature at our picnics. I believe a good time was had by all.

Due to popular demand we will make this a regular event, and may hold more than one each year. While I had hoped to have our next one in spring 2006, there was considerable support for holding one in the fall, so we’ll talk about it and see if we can manage to do this. If you have ideas for future picnics, let one of the NMCO officers know and we’ll see if it can be arranged.

Dr J
(Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO 505-857-0096 (home) 505-307-9069 (cell)
doctor.j@mindspring.com

thank you, Jeff, for putting the day together! – from all of us

7-15-05
More on the chess picnic. Last week I obtained a solid-chocolate chess set, and I propose to challenge former US women’s champion Alexey Root to a blitz game, with the set as stakes. If I win, the guys at the picnic will get to eat the pieces and board afterwards, if she wins, the gals do. Diane Barnard has graciously agreed to play if Alexey can’t make it or has to leave early, but Diane has already warned me how very dangerous it can be for anyone to come between women and chocolate… We’ve also been informed that Brad Earlewine will have some chess books available for sale at the picnic, so check them out. Local master Chris Candelario, who has just cut a CD of classical/flamenco guitar music, has been invited to bring his guitar and play, and he might be able to come.

See you all at the picnic!

Dr J

*** we have volunteers setting up tables/chairs at Taylor Park (under the shade trees) before 10am this Sunday. All players and friends are welcome!

7-10-05
Match challenge! 
  For 1800+ players visiting Moab, Utah (weekends) and/or Durango, Colorado (weekday evenings).   G/15, or G/60 to G/120.   Contact Damian Nash, d_nash@krusemer.com.

7-1-05
The latest (June ’05) Desert Knight is available online at:
HYPERLINK http://doubleexclam.home.comcast.net/DesertKnight/DKJune2005.pdfhttp://doubleexclam.home.comcast.net/DesertKnight/DKJune2005.pdf
Ryan McCracken
Editor, Desert Knight

6-24-05
I will be at the Frontier Restaurant at 6:00 PM or a little after on Friday 6/24/05,and will accept entries for the 2005 Albuquerque Open.—————— Dale Gibbs
advance entries

6-22-05
It’s not too late to pre-register for this weekend’s Albuquerque Open.  Entries received by 6/24/05 get a $10 discount off the full entry fee.  Mail entries to NMCO, P.O. Box 4215, Albuquerque, NM 87196.  Also, you can register in person tonight (Wed. 6/22) at the Coronado Chess Club meeting at 7:00 in the Frontier Restaurant in Albuquerque.
Ask for Dale Gibbs.
Dean Brunton, (505) 241-2618
dbrunto@pnm.com

6-17-05
Chess Club Leader/Chess Coach Needed for an Albuquerque Elementary.
A local elementary located near to UNM is looking for a Chess Club coach to run their chess club for the 05-06 school year. (NOTE: A separate Chess Academy will be held on a separate day, and will be run by a separate Chess Coach.) . The Chess Club will meet one to two afternoons per week for one hour, beginning at 3:55 pm.
The primary role of the Chess Coach/Club Leader will be to organize the students each club, so that students are actively paired each club, with students being rotated for skill and varied opponents on a regular basis. The Coach/Leader will need to provide frequent round-the-room casual assessments to ensure that all students are generally involved in a chess activity. Although chess instruction is a goal, the overall chess club management of all the students and their varying needs is the primary focus and duty of the Club Leader/Club Coach. The instructor will be asked and paid to maintain a chess club ladder, asked to maintain sign-in and out paperwork, and asked to provide intervention and communicate any problems or issues related to Chess Club or students. The Club Leader/Coach will work collaboratively with the Chess Academy Coach regarding placement of students. A parent volunteer will be available to assist at all clubs, with a Student Tutor likely for some of the clubs. Payment is $20 per hour, two times per year, as paid through Albuquerque Public Schools payment system. Questions? Contact: chesscoach2@yahoo.com.

6-15-05 More News On the Chess Picnic – We’ve spoken to her, and it looks like former US Women’s Champion Alexey Root will be coming to our Chess Picnic on Sunday, July 17 at the Taylor Park. She will be registering her kids at the Hummingbird Camp earlier that day, so she may arrive later, but she says she’s coming! It will be a great chance to talk to her about her chess exploits, her current work at the University of Texas-Dallas, about women’s chess, chess in education, and perhaps even get in a game. We will be renting about a dozen tables for games, but we may need help bringing them to the site, so if you have a small truck or RV which could hold a few (plus the chairs), please let one of the NMCO officers know. There are a couple of blitz variants which I’d like to play at the picnic – team blitz and Las Vegas chess. In team blitz, you have a partner and you alternate moves, with no consulting allowed. In Las Vegas chess, you roll dice to be able to move pieces (1=pawns, 2=knights, etc., with castling allowed if either a rook or king move is rolled). So remember to bring dice as well as sets and clocks! Dr J (Jeffrey Neil Burch) President, NMCO 505-857-0096 (home) 505-307-9069 (cell) doctor.j@mindspring.com

6-9-05
Hummingbird chess camp happens July 24 through July 30 as soon as Hummingbird Music camp castles king side.  Ages 8 through 14 may attend the 26th year of Chess camp. It is a residential camp and besides chess lessons, tournaments, and fun games we have campfires, swimming, fishing, camp outs, and recreational time. Our International Master is Alexey Root (featured in the Desert Knight) and other teachers rated around 1800. To sign up online please go to Hummingbirdmusiccamp.org and check the registration for chess camp.  Any questions email Elliott Higgins, director.
Ehig@aol.com.

6-12-05
Because of a cancellation, Hummingbird chess camp needs teachers for 8 to 12 age chess players. Need someone around 1800 for July 24-30. Pays, and free room and board. Looking for high school,college or adults. Elliott Higgins, 829-3060

6-6-05
Cherry Hills Chess Camp.
I am running a summer chess program each Thursday morning
10am-12noon at the Cherry Hills Library (NE Albuquerque) and have a fair size group of beginners.
Rod Avery

5-31-05
Results
…Called it the Farmington International Quick Chess Tournament, for fun.  Not much of a story to tell, aside from my first round upset at the hands of an aspiring 17-year-old.   Just a little, fun quick chess tournament in Farmington.  There will be others this fall.   Next one is in Durango on June 8 — for info write John Mical at jmical@bresnan.net.
Damian Nash, Moah, Utah

5-27-05
Greetings! My name is Daniel Breen, and I have been studying chess quite intensely for the last six months or so. I am an incoming Junior at Sandia High School, but am not currently a member of USCF or any chess club. I have attended Four Hills Chess Club twice, and I am interested in becoming more involved in the chess community. I enjoy annotating games, and I thought I might post this game that I played three months ago as a trial. I’m sorry I have been unable to provide any diagrams, but if I could be told how to do this greatly needed asset(ha ha) I would appreciate it. I would appreciate feedback on the annotations as well as the game quality at my e-mail address,dnlbreen@yahoo.com. The following game was played between my seventeen-year old brother, David Breen, and me, and is a good example of what can happen when a locked center comes into being for White early on in the Colle System. Thanks.

Daniel Breen (Unrated) – David Breen(Unrated) Colle System 2/05
1. d4  Nf6 2. e3  d5 3. Nf3 e6 4. Bd3 Bd6 5. O-O  O-O 6.Nbd2
The Colle System, created by the great attacker Colle. The Colle system can be played in virtually any order until the important pawn break e4 by White. …Bd7?! Not the best place for the Bishop, and giving White too many options. Best was 6…c5, attacking the White pawn chain and grabbing some space. 7. Re1 White prefers to slowly build up in the spirit of the Colle, but e4 would create more dynamic play. …Na6!? Apparently Black wants to stir things up a bit, perhaps tempt White to double Black’s pawns, which any master would never fall for in this opening. 8. c3 Prevents 8…Nb4 which would force White to give his best attacking piece or slow his development. …c5 9. e4 The all important pawn break. …c4?! A strategic error. Black releases the dynamic tension in the center, and he also locks it. 10. Bc2  Bb8?? A waste of time which allows White to lock in the center completely. The game is over. The following attack is impossible to repel. 11. e5! The center is locked, and the attack will come swiftly. …Ng4 12. Nf1 Bringing his forces to the Kingside. …f5 Trying to limit the scope of the King’s Bishop. It doesn’t matter because White has a huge amount of forces to call upon. 13. Ng3  Qb6 14. h3   Nh6 15. Bxh6 Ripping open the defensive structure and exposing the king. …gxh6 16. Qc1! Such a small move, but it accomplishes a great deal. The Kingside is opened for the Queen and the important pawn on b2 is temporarily protected. Without it the center could be opened and Black might be able to play for a draw. …Rf7 The coming storm will be violent. 17. Nh5  Nc7 18. Qxh6  Ne8 19. Ng5  Re7 It should be obvious who is winning. The results of locked center and poor defense. 20. Nf6+  Nxf6 21. exf6  e5 22. dxe5  Qc6 23. e6  Bh2+ 24. Kxh2  Qc7+ 25. Kg1  Bxe6 26. Nxe6  Qd7 27. Bxf5  Rf7 28. Re3  Kh8 29. Ng5  Qc7 30. Rae1  Rg8 31. Re8  Rff8 32. Qxf8  Qh2+ 33. Kxh2  Rxf8 34. Rxf8#  1-0

5/17/05
Just wanted to add my thanks
to Susan and Eddie for setting up our latest version of the New Mexico Chess Forum. Ryan’s post shows that some people want certain features or policies to be enacted on the Forum. This is still a work in progress – let us know what you want! In general NMCO news, the officers are considering several upcoming events:
– a team tournament is being discussed for the September time frame.
– a chess picnic is being planned for mid-July at Taylor Park in Albuquerque.
– we are contemplating holding our state’s blitz tournament in Santa Fe.
– an ad for the 2005 New Mexico Open will soon appear on the web page.
– unrated/beginner tournaments may be held to acquaint folks with tournament play.
Dr J (Jeffrey Neil Burch)
President, NMCO
doctor.j@mindspring.com

5-14-05
The New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology chess team has challenged/invited us (UNM) to a rematch.  They would like us to come down to Socorro for an evening match. Suggested dates would be May 23 or May 24 (Mon & Tues), but we could pick another date if those don’t work out.  They would have a 5 or 6 person team and they will be a strong team.  As you recall, the match in December was a 2.5-2.5 draw. Tech will treat us to dinner at a local Italian restaurant where we will hold the match.Our biggest issue is finding five players who can commit to making the trip. If you would like to play and can make it, please let me know soon.
Dean Brunton
dbrunto@pnm.com

5-20-05
We are going to have to delay our planned rematch with NM Tech.
  Hopefully we’ll be able to set a date sometime after Memorial Day that will work for all. Thanks to those of you who let me know you wanted to go.  I hope the new schedule will work for more of us.
Don’t forget, the Albuquerque Open is June 25-26 at the Marriott.
Dean Brunton

5-14-05
Here’s what I think we ought to strive for with a new forum.   — Posts go on the forum immediately. Posts should be placed on the forum in real-time. That way there are no frustrating long waits for a post to show up. Discussions can continue in (nearly) real time. However, this also makes things easier for spammers. There are two ways to deal with this. 1. Registration. I feel this is the best option. Only people who create a username and password may post to the forum. The forum athttp://www.pairlist.net/pipermail/retros/ is an example of one way to implement this in a simpler forum. Users send e-mail to a robot that posts their message automatically. 2. After-the-fact moderation. Simply go through and delete spam as it arises. I am willing to help do this if need be. — Simple *.html support. This allows users to post their own diagrams, if they are savvy enough. Those that are not comfortable doing this can still send diagrams to the webmaster for posting. These proposals would require more work at startup, but less maintenance (I hope!). I feel that this would provide the best of worlds for both webmasters and posters alike. Let me know if this is feasible. Regards,
Ryan M.
DoubleExclam@comcast.net

5-20-05
Registration and passwords are definitely possible
, though we’ll try to stay with this system as long as it works, since several players have asked for this simple style. This way, no one needs to register. ***Posters are still welcome to sign their rants as ‘anonymous’ if they wish! However, ads/spam/crude language will be filtered out before they ever get posted. We can also post games and diagrams here, usually same day.
Susan and Ed Koenig

5-20-05
There’s no need to mandate registration. The advantage of registration should be the right to post instantly on the forum. In other words, the registered do not send e-mail, but rather they make their post in an *.html form, just like Al’s old forum used to be before moderation. The registered user takes full responsibility for the content of his/her post; posts with inappropriate advertising or obscene language result in suspension or termination of the poster’s privileges. Those who do not wish to register may still send e-mail to forum@nmchess.org. They will have to wait longer for their post to appear, but they will be spared the ‘hassle’ of registering.
Ryan McCracken

5-21-05
Your suggestion is certainly possible for the future, if needed.
Susan

5-14-05
Colle system games wanted. If you play the Colle, or have played against it, your games are needed for a new book on the Colle System. Please send or e-mail your games to: Pawn Promotions 146 Oak Street Bridgewater, NJ 08807 e-mail: gambit@pawnpromotions.org. All ratings wanted. Thank you.
www.pawnpromotions.org